Month: July 2019

As the human race progresses, our art becomes more and more defining of us. Art is immeasurably appreciable across so many formats and eloquently expresses many thought processes. Without it, we might be unable to move forward properly. With all of its properties, the variance of art tells so many tales. Thus far, we are
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There’s currently a somber hush to the summer air that makes you think, “where are the birds?” Some long-distance migrators do start moving south as early as July, but most of the species you saw back in June loafing near parks and feeders should still be around. They may be hunkered down, conserving energy like
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When it comes to apartment living, there are many aspects you need to consider while keeping a dog. First of all, one has to make sure the apartment owners allow people to keep pets in their property because dogs can mess around, vocalize, and create chaos if they are not well-trained. However, this doesn’t mean
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In Ísafjörður, the capital of Iceland’s remote Westfjords region, a Lutheran pastor compared eiderdown to cocaine. “I sometimes think that we are like the coca farmers in Colombia,” he said. “We [the down harvesters] get a fraction of the price when the product hits the streets of Tokyo. This is the finest down in the
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From rays to deep-sea snails, primates to rosewood trees, the latest IUCN Red List update paints a gloomy picture for our world’s species. The update, which includes assessments of 105,732 animal and plant species to date, lists more than 28,000 species as threatened with extinction, attributing much of the declines to human overexploitation. Red-capped mangabey
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Illustration: Joe Ciardiello Who’s Kenn? Simply put, Kenn is a national treasure. A renowned birder, author, and conservationist, Kenn Kaufman has spent his life dedicated to observing birds, reading about birds, writing about birds, and sharing the world of birds with others. With all that birdy knowledge in his brain, he also acts as the field editor for Audubon magazine. And so,
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Black Tern. Photo: Diana Whiting/Audubon Photography Awards WASHINGTON – “The Great Lakes are home to 30 million people and 350 species of birds— restoration efforts are one of Audubon’s top priorities,” said Julie Hill-Gabriel, National Audubon Society’s Vice President for Water Conservation. “With increasing challenges on the horizon for the world’s largest body of freshwater,
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Unfortunately, killing mountain lions (cougars) is legal in much of the United States. They are a considered a “game species” and are legally hunted for sport in these thirteen states: Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, and North Dakota. In these states, the wildlife management agencies dictate
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New research finds that thousands of sharks and rays could be entangled in the plastic polluting Earth’s oceans. Scientists at the UK’s University of Exeter examined existing scientific literature and took to Twitter to find documented instances of shark and ray entanglements. They ended up finding reports of more than 1,000 entangled animals — and
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Pesticides being sprayed on soybean crops. Photo: Pulsar Imagens/Alamy The widely used pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or neonics, have at least two major problems. First, research shows they contribute to the troubling, ongoing die-off of bees, and may seriously harm birds. Second, like other pesticides, they’re becoming less effective as the insects they target develop
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Summer—that sizzling time of the year when we try to stay hydrated and perhaps indulge in water-dense foods like watermelon and other juicy fruits. When exposed to the summer heat, we might break out in a sweat and seek shade to cool our bodies down. What about our feathered friends…how do they stay cool? Here
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Recently, Renato Borella decided to go on a little fishing expedition along the Teles Pires River in Brazil. What he wasn’t expecting, of course, was that his most memorable catch wouldn’t be a fish at all. Renato Borella Shortly after setting off on a boat with his fishing guide, Borella spotted something in the distance. There, struggling against
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