Month: April 2019

Scientists and officials around the US have told the Guardian that the Trump administration has withdrawn funding for a large, successful conservation program – in direct contradiction of instructions from Congress. Unique in scale and ambition, the program comprises 22 research centers that tackle big-picture issues affecting huge swaths of the US, such as climate
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Great Blue Heron. Photo: John Phillips/Audubon Photography Awards WASHINGTON—“More than 400 bird species and 36 million people rely on the Colorado River. Studies show that as temperatures continue to rise, the Colorado River and the rivers that feed it will become even more important for people and for birds like the Yellow-billed Cuckoo and the
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There’s only one downside to being a cat parent: stinky, dirty litter boxes. In addition to the mess and odor, clay and clumping litters often contain potentially harmful chemicals that have no business near your family. That’s why iHeartCats partnered with PrettyLitter, a revolutionary new product that blows the competition out of the water when it comes to safety,
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Black-billed Magpie. Photo: Amanda Ubell/Audubon Photography Awards This audio story is brought to you by BirdNote, a partner of The National Audubon Society. BirdNote episodes air daily on public radio stations nationwide. This is BirdNote. Rossini’s 1815 opera,The Thieving Magpie tells of a household maid who nearly goes to the gallows for stealing silver from her
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One of the joys of spring is hearing the beautiful songs of returning migrant birds. Avian voices are works of art that can help us know what’s around and lead us to the species we most want to see. Learning bird songs, however, is not always easy. The typical translations we find in field guides, like the Yellow-throated Vireo’s rrreeyoo,
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Nobody had ever called Nellie brave before. Until a few weeks ago, the adjectives fearful, protective, shy or cautious were most commonly used to describe the homeless pit bull. But that all changed when 5-year-old Nellie got between her foster mom, Jane Taylor, and a rattlesnake while on a hike in a Texas state park.
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